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Sulphuric Acid on the WebTM Technical Manual DKL Engineering, Inc.

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Sulphuric Acid on the Web

Introduction
General
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Instrumentation
Industry News
Maintenance
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Acid Plant Database
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Library

Technical Manual

Introduction
General

Definitions
Instrumentation
Plant Safety
Metallurgial Processes
Metallurgical
Sulphur Burning
Acid Regeneration
Lead Chamber
Technology
Gas Cleaning
Contact
Strong Acid
Acid Storage
Loading/Unloading

Transportation
Sulphur Systems
Liquid SO2
Boiler Feed Water
Steam Systems

Cooling Water
Effluent Treatment
Utilities
Construction
Maintenance
Inspection
Analytical Procedures
Materials of Construction
Corrosion
Properties
Vendor Data

DKL Engineering, Inc.

Handbook of Sulphuric Acid Manufacturing
Order Form
Preface
Contents
Feedback

Sulphuric Acid Decolourization
Order Form
Preface
Table of Contents

Process Engineering Data Sheets - PEDS
Order Form
Table of Contents

Introduction

Bibliography of Sulphuric Acid Technology
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Preface
Contents

Sulphuric Acid Plant Specifications
 

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Maintenance and Inspection - Stack
September 8, 2003

Introduction
Stack Washing
Associated Links

Introduction

There is very little maintenance and inspection required for an acid plant stack.

Periodically, a thorough thickness survey should be done of the stack in the area of gas breach.

Stack Washing

The most common problem encountered with stacks is the emission of sulphate deposits.   During a prolonged stoppage the final inspection and cleaning of the stack base should be left as late as practically possible before starting up.

Some plant operators have found that cleaning of the stack can be achieved by introducing steam into the base during a plant stoppage.  The steam is left on for several hours and as it condenses it washes the sulphate off the walls.

Some plants wash their stacks on a regular basis every 6 months.   Washing the stack will tend to shorten the life of the stack.