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Sulphuric Acid on the WebTM Technical Manual DKL Engineering, Inc.

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Sulphuric Acid on the Web

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DKL Engineering, Inc.

Handbook of Sulphuric Acid Manufacturing
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Preface
Contents
Feedback

Sulphuric Acid Decolourization
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Preface
Table of Contents

Process Engineering Data Sheets - PEDS
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Table of Contents

Introduction

Bibliography of Sulphuric Acid Technology
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Preface
Contents

Sulphuric Acid Plant Specifications
 

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Strong Acid System - Containment Areas
March 31, 2003

Introduction
Material
Trenches
Expansion Joints

Associated Links

Introduction

Acid brick is the most durable option for lining a concrete floor or containment area to protect it from sulphuric acid spills.   The initial cost for an acid lined floor is higher than a painted protective coating but long term maintenance costs are lower over the long term.

A typical acid resistant brick lining system will consists of the following:

Vertical surfaces generally will not require the underlying membrane since the risk of

A minimum brick thickness of 1 1/8” is recommended.  This will allow the load to be more evenly distributed over the membrane and is sufficiently thick to support the normal expected loads on the floor without damage to the brick.

The floor should be installed using the bricklayers method employing mortar joints 1/8” wide rather than the tile setters method with ¼” mortar joints.

Material

The acid resistant brick used for the flooring must have the following characteristics:

Of the two types of brick generally available, red shale is preferred over fireclay brick.  Red shale brick possesses all of the above characteristics and is generally less expensive than fireclay brick.

Trenches

The lining of trenches is similar to the method employed for the general floor area.  A standard brick (i.e. 2 ½” thick) is recommended for the vertical walls of the trench to ensure that the wall is properly supported.

Expansion Joints

Acid brick is subject to irreversible growth over time due to absorption of moisture and acid.  Sufficient allowance for this growth must be allowed for in the design and installation of the floor otherwise failure of the lining will result.